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  1. Aeon Fujinomiya Cinema
    Phone: 0544-28-2222
    Address: Fujinomiya, Shizuoka Prefecture Asama-cho, the No. 1 No. 8
    ion Mall Fujinomiya 3F

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    Last edited 4 months ago by RaphaelQS
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    KDDI
    KDDI Corporation
    KDDI
    KDDI Logo.svg
    Type
    Public (K.K.)
    Traded as TYO: 9433
    Industry Telecommunications
    Founded June 1, 1984; 31 years ago
    Founder Kazuo Inamori
    Headquarters Chiyoda, Tokyo, Japan
    Key people
    Takashi Tanaka, CEO
    Products Fixed line and mobile telephony, Internet services, digital television
    Revenue Increase US$ 41.30 billion (2012)[1]
    Net income
    Increase US$ 3.1 billion (2012)[1]
    Number of employees
    18,418 (2010)[1]
    Parent Kyocera (12.76%)
    Toyota (11.09%)
    Subsidiaries KDDI R&D Labs
    KDDI Network & Solutions
    Kokusai Cable Ship
    Okinawa Cellular Telephone
    KDDI America
    Website http://www.kddi.com
    KDDI Corporation (KDDI Kabushiki Gaisha?) (TYO: 9433) is a Japanese telecommunications operator formed in October 1, 2000 through the merger of DDI Corp. (Daini-Denden Inc.), KDD (Kokusai Denshin Denwa) Corp., and IDO Corp.[2] It has its headquarters in the Garden Air Tower in Iidabashi, Chiyoda, Tokyo.[3]

    KDDI provides mobile cellular services using the “au by KDDI” brand. ISP network and solution services are provided under the au one net brand, while “au Hikari” is the name under which long-distance and international voice and data communications services and Fiber to the Home (FTTH) services are marketed. ADSL broadband services carry the brand name “ADSL One”, and IP telephony over copper is branded as “Metal Plus”.

    History

    Lawsuits

    See also

    References and footnotes

    External links

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    Last edited 3 hours ago by AnomieBOT
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    Impeachment
    This article is about a step in the removal of a public official. For challenging a witness in a legal proceeding, see witness impeachment.
    Impeachment is a formal process in which an official is accused of unlawful activity, the outcome of which, depending on the country, may include the removal of that official from office as well as criminal or civil punishment.

    Etymology and history Edit

    The word “impeachment” derives from Latin roots expressing the idea of becoming caught or entrapped, and has analogues in the modern French verb empêcher (to prevent) and the modern English impede. Medieval popular etymology also associated it (wrongly) with derivations from the Latin impetere (to attack). (In its more frequent and more technical usage, impeachment of a witness means challenging the honesty or credibility of that person.)

    The impeachment process should not be confused with a recall election, which is usually initiated by voters and can be based on “political charges”, for example mismanagement. Impeachment is initiated by a constitutional body (usually legislative) and usually—but not always—stems from an indictable offense. The steps that remove the official from office are also different.

    Impeachment was first used in the British political system.[citation needed] Specifically, the process was first used by the English “Good Parliament” against Baron Latimer in the second half of the 14th century. Following the British example, the constitutions of Virginia (1776), Massachusetts (1780) and other states thereafter adopted the impeachment mechanism; however, they restricted the punishment to removal of the official from office. In private organizations, a motion to impeach can be used to prefer charges.[1]

    In various jurisdictions

    References

    Further reading

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    Last edited 18 days ago by Niceguyedc
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    Deposition (law)
    In the law of the United States, a deposition is the out-of-court oral testimony of a witness that is reduced to writing for later use in court or for discovery purposes. It is commonly used in litigation in the United States and Canada, where it is called examination for discovery, and is almost always conducted outside of court by the lawyers themselves (that is, the judge is not present to supervise the examination). In other countries, testimony is usually preserved for future use by way of live testimony in the courtroom, or by way of written affidavit.

    A minority of U.S. states, such as New York, refer to the deposition as an “examination before trial” (EBT). Deposition is the preferred term in U.S. federal courts and in the majority of U.S. states, such as California, because depositions are sometimes taken during trial in a number of unusual situations. For example, in certain states such as California[1] and New York,[2] the litigation process may be drastically accelerated if the plaintiff is dying from a terminal illness.

    Depositions are a part of the discovery process in which litigants gather information in preparation for trial. Some jurisdictions recognise an affidavit as a form of deposition, sometimes called a “deposition upon written questions.” This developed in Canada and the United States in the nineteenth century. While in common law jurisdictions such as England and Wales, Australia, and New Zealand recording the oral evidence of supporting witnesses (‘obtaining a statement’) is routine during pre-litigation investigations, having the right to pose oral questions to the opposing party’s witnesses before trial is not.

    United States

    Other jurisdictions

    See also

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    Last edited 18 days ago by Victor Lopes
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    Primeiro Comando da Capital
    Primeiro Comando do Capital
    Founded 1993
    Founding location Taubaté prison, São Paulo, Brazil
    Years active 1993-present
    Criminal activities Drug trafficking, murder, fraud, pimping, arms trafficking, extortion, assault, money laundering, smuggling, kidnapping, highway robbery, bribery, gambling and human trafficking
    Primeiro Comando da Capital, or PCC (“First Command of the Capital”, Portuguese pronunciation: [pɾiˈmejɾu koˈmɐ̃du da kapiˈtaw]), is, according to a 2012 Brazilian Government report, the largest Brazilian criminal organization[1] with a membership of 13,000 members, 6,000 of whom are in prison.[2]

    The criminal organization based largely in the state of São Paulo and is active in at least 22 of the country’s 27 states, as well as in Paraguay and Bolivia.[3] Since its inception, PCC has been responsible for several criminal activities such as prison breaks, prison riots, drug trafficking and highway robbery. The name refers to the state capital, city of São Paulo.

    In 2012 a wave of violence in Sao Paulo killed upwards of 100 people including many police officers allegedly following the breakdown of an informal truce between the gang and the police.[4]

    History

    May 2006 attacks

    2012 attacks

    2013 Activity

    The Statute

    See also

    References

    External links

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    Diogo shoji e iida meire trampando das 9pm to 9am todo dia folgando de sabado toda semana junto com jobson ohno saindo 8:45 pm da casa e mae sai 8:30 shoji quem falou com antonio do forno que esta no brazil o primo

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