Boxer Tommy Morrison believed in HIV conspiracy theory

   

Boxer Tommy Morrison passed away on Sunday, September 1st, 2013 from AIDS. He’s a legend in boxing circles, but the focus of this post (and website in general) is to cover the conspiracy theories that he believed in at one time regarding HIV. He contracted the virus but then later came out to say that he didn’t believe in it and that it was a conspiracy by the government.

Here’s ESPN:

   

He said HIV was a conspiracy by the government, that his positive test was possibly the evil work of a rival promoter.

"Tommy bought into it at first, and then did some research," Holden said. "And then he went into the direction that he didn’t have it, that it doesn’t exist."
And so after his tearful news conference, after he confirmed he was HIV-positive and blamed it on a reckless lifestyle, after he promised to get in touch with anyone he’d come in contact with — sparring partners, and especially the young ladies — Morrison did a complete about-face.

Holden said Morrison quickly had a change of heart after doing research on the Internet. He concluded that HIV was a conspiracy, and that the doctors were "quacks." He said the tests were false positives. He staged a comeback in 2007, tested negative for HIV, but questions swirled over whether the blood was actually his.

"House of Numbers" is a controversial film about HIV and AIDS that the New York Times once called "a weaselly support pamphlet for AIDS denialists." Tommy, according to Trisha, watched the documentary with his mouth wide open. He told her that he’s been saying the same things about HIV for years, but nobody believed him.

Before she met Morrison, Trisha didn’t have a lot of thoughts on HIV or AIDS. She used to believe that a person had to "be careful" around HIV patients. But then she did her own research. She goes on about how she wants to see a real picture of the virus, not just a computer-generated image.

Dr. Richard Haubrich, a professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of California San Diego, said that there are photos of HIV using scanning electron microscopes.

"HIV," Haubrich said in an email, "is the best documented infection there is."

But Trisha is resolute. She forwards an email to ESPN.com with Morrison’s viral load levels. She sends a text that says HIV tests on the market do not detect HIV infection. She refers to Dr. Robert Gallo, the man known for his role in the discovery of HIV as the infectious agent responsible for AIDS, as "the biggest medical fraud in history."

That ESPN article goes on in detail behind his denial of the disease and hopes for a comeback, and it’s truly a sad tale to read through, you can’t help but feel bad for the guy (although that’s the last thing he’d want from what the article says).

Here’s the documentary about AIDS called House of Numbers that is referred to in the article:

   
   

Author: Isaac Weishaupt

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